Toggle Accessibility Tools

Gregg Howe earns University Distinguished Professor title

Gregg Howe has been named University Distinguished Professor. He is among ten MSU faculty members who have earned the distinction.

The title of University Distinguished Professor is among the highest honors that can be bestowed on a faculty member by the university. Those selected for the title have been recognized nationally and internationally for the importance of their teaching, research and outreach achievements.

Gregg is an internationally recognized leader in research on plant hormone biology and plant-insect interactions. Howe uses a combination of genetic, cell biological, molecular, and biochemical analyses to study how plants use defensive compounds to thwart insect attack. He was also recently named an MSU Foundation Professor.

The MSU Board of Trustees voted on and approved their ten recommendations on June 21. Those holding the professorship will receive, in addition to their salary, a stipend of $5,000 per year for five years to support professional activities.

A reception to honor the newly designated University Distinguished Professors will be held in November.

 

Share this story

Top Stories

DOE renews funding for innovative photosynthesis research at MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory DOE renews funding for innovative photosynthesis research at MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded the Michigan State University-DOE Plant Research Laboratory a three-year (2020-2023), $11.25 million DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences competitive renewal grant to continue its innovative photosynthesis research.

New method tracks cyanobacteria photosynthetic productivity, in real time New method tracks cyanobacteria photosynthetic productivity, in real time

Scientists have established a new method to quantify how much cyanobacteria assimilate carbon in the process of photosynthesis. The method assesses carbon assimilation over a stretch of time. It also better factors in a wider range of environmental variables, such as changing carbon dioxide (CO2) levels or varying light intensities.

First-Person Science: Christoph Benning on Plant Biochemistry [LINK] First-Person Science: Christoph Benning on Plant Biochemistry [LINK]

Benning is featured on the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science's 'First-Person Science' series, where scientists describe how they made significant discoveries over years of research.