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Hu co-authors paper on the regulation of plant stress response

Peroxisomes are little cellular membrane-delimited compartments that break down fatty acids – important sources of cell fuels – and get rid of reactive oxygen species, also known as ROS and very damaging to plant cells (also a cause of aging in humans).

The research examined how the so-called peroxules, membraneous extensions of peroxisomes are associated with ROS in plant cells. It was found that a peroxisome protein, PEX11a, regulates peroxule formations as a response to environmental stress signals that lead to the accumulation of ROS, and brings ROS levels back under control.

The findings have been published in the journal Plant Physiology. The authors, in addition to Hu, are Maria Rodrigues-Serrano,  Maria C Romero-Puertas, Maria Sanz-Fernandez, and Luisa M. Sandalio, all from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology of Plants, Estación 6 Experimental del Zaidín-CSIC in Granada, Spain.

Go here for a full online copy of the article.

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