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Sheng Yang He and Gregg Howe named 2017 Highly Cited Researchers

For the third year in a row, Sheng Yang He and Gregg Howe have been named Highly Cited Researchers by Clarivate Analytics (formerly done by Thomson Reuters).

According to Clarivate Analytics, this distinction is for, "research that ranks among the top 1% most cited works in [their] fields and during [their] year of publication, earning the mark of exceptional impact... for [their] dedication and focus to expanding the sphere of human knowledge." 

Dr. Howe's research focuses on how plants protect themselves from pests and herbivores, while Dr. He's focus is on plant defense against pathogens.

This acknowledgement continues a good year for both researchers.

Dr. Howe was recently named University Distinguished Professor, while Dr. He was re-appointed a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator earlier this year.


Banner image of Arabidopsis thaliana by Dawid Skalec [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

 

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