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There are 3 item(s) tagged with the keyword "Walton lab".

Displaying: 1 - 3 of 3

Jonathan Walton 1953-2018

We are saddened that Jonathan Walton passed away on October 18, 2018 after a brief illness.

Tags: Walton lab By By Christoph Benning; Banner image by Harley J Seeley Photography
Scratching the genetic surface of poisonous mushrooms

The Walton lab has sequenced the genomes of two species of poisonous Amanita mushrooms, with an eye towards harnessing them for medicinal and biological uses.

Tags: Walton lab, fundamental research By By Igor Houwat, Jonathan Walton; Banner image by Diana Gerba
Fighting back the Yellow Dragon

The Walton lab and a team of international researchers are exploring a natural tool to combat citrus greening, one of the most economically devastating citrus diseases worldwide.

Tags: Walton lab, green solutions By By Igor Houwat, Jonathan Walton; Banner image by Baltasar Vischi, CC BY 2.0

Displaying: 1 - 3 of 3

Top Stories

Recently discovered protein enhances understanding of photosynthesis Recently discovered protein enhances understanding of photosynthesis

MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory (PRL) scientists have published a new study that furthers our understanding of how plants make membranes in chloroplasts, the photosynthesis powerhouse

Using Artificial Intelligence to delve into plant cell secrets Using Artificial Intelligence to delve into plant cell secrets

A new AI system, called DeepLearnMOR, can identify organelles and classify hundreds of microscopy images in a matter of seconds and with an accuracy rate of over 97%. The study illustrates the potential of AI to significantly increase the scope, speed, and accuracy of screening tools in plant biology.

Study links energy metabolism to reduced fertility in overheated bean crops Study links energy metabolism to reduced fertility in overheated bean crops

The study reports that the activity levels of the carbon metabolism protein, G6PDH, are related to decreased production of pollen in bean flowers. As global temperatures rise, some bean crops, including Michigan-grown varieties, might be more sensitive to higher heat levels.