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Three faculty named 2019 Highly Cited Researchers

Three MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory (PRL) researchers have been recognized in the 2019 Highly Cited Researchers List compiled by Clarivate Analytics.

Each year, the Web of Science Group identifies the world’s most influential researchers. The list includes those who have been most cited by peers over the past decade. According to the report, “in 2019, fewer than 6,300, or 0.1%, of the world's researchers, across 21 research fields, have earned this exclusive distinction.”

The three faculty members are:

Christoph Benning

Christoph Benning, whose research addresses lipid metabolism in plants and algae. This is his maiden appearance on the list.

Sheng Yang He

Sheng Yang He, who researches plant–pathogen interactions, with an increasing focus on how climate conditions and plant microbiome impact such interactions. He has earned the distinction for six years in a row.

Gregg Howe

Gregg Howe, also appearing on the list for six years in a row. His research addresses the molecular and chemical basis of plant defense against insects.

 

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